Department of Chemistry

Diversity

The Waters Group 2007

At the Department of Chemistry, we feel strongly that diversity is crucial to our pursuit of academic excellence, and we are deeply committed to creating a diverse and inclusive community.

We support UNC's policy, which states that "the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is committed to equality of opportunity and pledges that it will not practice or permit discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran's status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression."

 

Commitment

Old Well

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has a long-held tradition of striving for excellence. A critical element for any twenty-first century educational institution is a diverse and inclusive community.

The vision of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs is to build and sustain an inclusive campus community and to foster a welcoming climate that values and respects all members of the University community. The mission of the Office affirms the University's commitment to diversity as a critical element of academic excellence.

 

Inclusion

Students

The University of North Carolina has excellent opportunities for postdoctoral researchers from underrepresented groups interested in faculty positions.

The Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity encourages faculty diversity by recruiting outstanding scholars to perform postdoctoral research at UNC Chapel Hill, with the goal of training the next generation of faculty scholars. Chemists interested in this program are strongly encouraged to contact a faculty member whose research interests them. The application window typically opens in September.

The Importance of Diversity

The recent release of a report from the National Research Council, provides an ideal opportunity for considering what Professor Joseph DeSimone and his Project manager, Crista Farrell, have learned about the power of diversity and how their knowledge may be used in discussions of convergence as a conceptual framework for problem-solving and innovation in the 21st century.

diversity

Their article, Driving Convergence with Human Diversity, published in Science Translational Medicine, discusses the role and power of diversity in day-to-day research practices, and how to follow the NRC report's recommendation of "adopting inclusive attitudes toward diversity and using management strategies to foster diversity."

 

Marcey Waters Named WOWS Scholar

Professor Marcey Waters has been named a WOWS, Working on Women in Science, Scholar in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Marcey Waters

The program was initiated in 2007 and the award recognizes Professor Waters role as an outstanding mentor, researcher, scholar, teacher, and leader.

 

Michael Zhou - ACS Project SEED Student

Michael Zhou is a rising high school senior who is doing laboratory research this summer in the UNC Chemistry Department under the aegis of the American Chemical Society's Project SEED program. Michael is working with 2nd year Ph.D. student Sam Bartlett in the Johnson Group in the area of organocatalysis. Michael is searching for small molecule catalysts that mimic the action of enzymes but allow for a much broader substrate scope than enzymes typically do.

Johnson Lab Image

The The ACS Project SEED summer research program opens new doors for economically disadvantaged students to experience what it is like to be a chemist. Students entering their junior or senior year in high school are given a rare chance to work alongside scientist-mentors on research projects in industrial, academic, and federal laboratories, discovering new career paths as they approach critical turning points in their lives.

 

Chemistry Women Mentorship Network

Carolina Professor Jillian Dempsey and Professor Brandi Cossairt with the University of Washington, have together launched the Chemistry Women Mentorship Network. The goal of the organization is to create a national network of women in academic chemistry to provide support, encouragement, and mentorship for young women considering careers in academia.

Chemistry Women Mentorship Network

You are cordially invited to join the network. Please share this information with anyone you feel will be interested.

 

Summer Research

Olivia Finster is visiting the department from Grinnell College in Iowa through the Undergraduate Summer Research Program of the Center for Enabling New Technologies through Catalysis, CENTC, a Phase III NSF Center for Chemical Innovation. The CENTC summer program is committed to providing research experiences for students from underrepresented groups or from institutions without ample research opportunities.

Miller, Finster, and Pitman

Working in the Miller Group, Olivia is performing research under the mentorship of first year graduate student Kate Pitman to synthesize and study homogeneous catalysts. Finster and Pitman are working to develop electrocatalysts for use in key steps in a CO2 reduction process. The research extends beyond Chapel Hill, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Washington and University of Michigan. The CENTC summer research program features weekly videoconferences where students get to know each other even though they are at distant institutions. UNC is proud to help sponsor such an innovative first research experience, which will certainly help Olivia pursue her dream of performing research in sustainability.

 

Hogan Latino Diamante Awardee

Congratulations to Professor Brian Hogan on winning the Latino Diamante Award in the Advocacy Category. Diamante, Inc. of North Carolina is one of the largest Hispanic philanthropic societies in the state. The Latino Diamante Award is a statewide program created to recognize outstanding achievements and honor people, like Brian, who are making significant contributions to the Hispanic community of North Carolina.

Brian Hogan

Brian Hogan was selected from a group of over one thousand nominees statewide, because of his demonstrated commitment to increasing access for Latinos in higher education through your directorship and leadership in the Scholars' Latino Initiative. The committee was impressed with Brian's continuing efforts to work with the Latino community to promote greater participation in math and science in an effort to prepare the next generation of Hispanic scientists. Further, Brian's global efforts to bring impoverished Guatemalan youth to the United States for High School while simultaneously working in Central America to build schools and improve womens' literacy are truly laudable and worthy of this prestigious recognition.